Her Circle

How this Red Carpet Reporter & Playboy Dubbed "Celebrity Whisperer" Became a Much-Needed Voice for the People

June 26, 2022 Angela Marie Christian Season 1 Episode 19
Her Circle
How this Red Carpet Reporter & Playboy Dubbed "Celebrity Whisperer" Became a Much-Needed Voice for the People
Show Notes Transcript

I loved my conversation with Taylor Ferber in this episode.  Taylor is a former VH1 & MTV employee, red carpet reporter, Playboy dubbed her the "celebrity whisperer," and host of both Talk to me Taylor & Cancel Me, Baby! the podcast.

I met Taylor in a Mastermind and loved her energy.  I started listening to her podcast episodes and was amazed at the courageous topics she was covering. 

During our interview together she shares her journey (which started at  MTV & VH1), interesting interactions on the red carpet with celebrities, and we touch on topics that we're both passionate about, including: how proud we are to be women, how difficult it is to raise kids in this world right now, and the entrepreneurial struggle. 

If you haven't listened to her podcast yet, you are missing out!

You can follow Taylor on Instagram and read more about her on website here.

Make sure you follow my show on Instagram for updates here

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Angela Marie Christian
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Speaker 1:

Welcome to her circle, a virtual women's group, where the focus is leveling up your life. My name is Angela Christian, and I'm your host. I hope you navigate a new path in your life while I do the same, whether it's mindfulness, manifestation, mental fitness, women's health or business tips. I'm your girl. After a decade in corporate finance, I'm finally pursuing a career. I love as I learn how to do this. I'll share every step of the way. Not only that, but I'll teach you how to become more, present, how to listen to your higher self and how to listen to your body. My guests, and I will talk about spiritual and personal development relationships, trauma, and how to find your purpose stick with me and let's grow together. This is her circle. Well , ladies today I have a super exciting guest Taylor Ferber Taylor and I met when she came into the super connector mastermind as a guest, giving us advice on podcasting and pitching. Taylor is a former veteran red carpet reporter who asked a lot deeper questions than just who are you wearing? Playboy called her the celebrity whisper. And she has been up and personal with everyone from Chris Pratt to Oprah, to Zach Efron, and many more. You might have seen her contributions in us weekly or the Hollywood reporter. And she's covered every major event from the Emmy's to the Grammy's to the vanity fair Oscar party on one of her recent podcasts. She dove into the Amber, her Johnny DEP case, and released an interview with her that took place on the set of Aquaman, which was really interesting. Um, one of the reasons I respect Taylor so much is that she's not afraid to speak the truth and spotlight issues in our society, that other people are too scared to mention or talk about. Not only that, but she's courageous enough to call people out like Chrissy, Tegan when appropriate. So if you're tired of PC pop culture, then you have to check out her podcast. Cancel me, baby. So without further ado, welcome Taylor. Thank you so much for being here.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, Angela. For the beautiful introduction. I am so excited. So thank you .

Speaker 1:

Thank you. Um, I love your spunk and fire and it's like, you know, I have young kids, so I was always thinking like, I wonder if she was like this as a child. So I'm so curious to know, like, what was kid Taylor ? Like? Were you the same or were you different?

Speaker 2:

I love that question. I have been interviewed a ton and you know, I've never gotten asked that and it really makes me smile because I think the kid in us almost pre it's before we're conditioned, right. To think anything about society, it's so pure. And, and that's what I love about it. And that's why, you know, spiritual people will be like, be in touch with your inner child. It's kind of woo, woo . But it's true. Yeah . And I think a perfect example of this. Well, first of all, I always felt like an entertainer. Like I was a floater through all my grade school years, high school. Like I would hang out with like the theater kids and then like the football team. And then over here with like the art kids, you know, I was everywhere and I always just wanted to make people laugh and I always wanted to connect people. So even when we would be hanging out in high school, I'd be like, all right guys, like, let's go around and play two truths in a dare. You know what I mean? Like I was always that person to kind of start stuff up. And when I talk about the kid in us, I mean, this says it all, like kids would be, you know, hanging out at summer camp, doing all this cool stuff and where would I be? But in my basement, in the hot summer days, literally doing home videos, impersonating, you know, Ryan CRE on American idol and Carson daily on TRL <laugh> . So that says it all right there. And , um, you know, our , our kid selves are, are privy to, I think our futures, they know a lot more, I think, than we do. So. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Yes , definitely. I love that. That's kind of what I imagined, but some people are like totally opposite. So I just wasn't

Speaker 2:

Sure. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I was kind of the same. I mean, I actually was always on the home videos trying to take over, but then I went through a really shy period. And then now I'm feeling like back in touch with that, you know, kid self. So

Speaker 2:

You know what Angela and it's, it's so important because, and I'm sure you've experienced this in some of your listeners as well, being an entrepreneur will grind you down. It's so hard. And oddly enough, I think of that kid self all the time, because I'm like, that's at your core, that's at your core. So again, like it's almost like our kids' selves , like knew before we did like who we were, what we wanted to do. And I always go back to that and really hard times I've sacrificed so much. And I think of that again, because it's like so pure and true, you know? Yeah .

Speaker 1:

I love that. That's so true. Yeah. When I see my kids, they're just so innocent and I really encourage them to just be themselves and, you know, do what do whatever they feel like doing. And , um, yeah, it's so important. So , um , yeah. And you know, you, I was reading, you know, a lot about your career and you just have a really interesting career and I would love for you to tell our listeners a bit about your background. And then , um, I didn't know if you ever had like a corporate job, but like how did you become a contributor to these high pro high profile outlets and then ultimately be the like selfie stick rogue reporter, and then now where you're at. So I'd love for you to walk us through that.

Speaker 2:

Oh my gosh. It's been such an interesting journey. I started off in corporate America. It doesn't seem corporate. I worked in the TRL building in times square, right? Speaking of Carson daily . And I worked at V H one MTV as a producer, oddly enough, again, it's still like it's entertainment, it's sexy. It's cool. And being an entrepreneurial mind, and I didn't even know it at the time. It just felt too much of a controlling environment to me. I didn't like playing by rules and answering to a boss and no Taylor , you know, here are the guidelines of what your stuff has to look like. Right. So I started off there and then I did make my way. I knew that I wanted to do celebrity interviews. I always like writing is my, my first passion. So funny enough, what I did was basically I went to the, you know, senior vice president of editorial at VH1, and this is in times square. And I was like, I wanna work for you. I wanna work for your team. And it worked out, right. So I ended up doing that. I started doing celebrity interviews, writing posts, and then I, again, taking, you know, life by the balls. I said to him, you know, a year later I was like, so I'm going out to LA uh, either you roll with or rollout, you know, if you want me to stay on your team. So he was like, my boss was like, all right , go for it. You know? Cause I knew that's where all the action was. So I went out to LA with VH one , doing some red carpets. But again, I had to do everything on my own. They don't think guys like they didn't hand anything to me. Do you know what I did, Angela? I literally went into, you know, a storage closet, found a VH, one microphone, hired a camera guy and would go out on my own. Yes <laugh> and like took it upon myself. Cause I was like, if they don't do it, you somewhat has to. Right. So funny enough as I do speaking up, going against the grain, I am out in LA for only a couple of months and I called out Chrissy Tegan again, knowing before my time would ultimately would unfold. I called her out for bullying people on Twitter. So it ended up becoming, it got national attention. She went after me on Twitter, went after VH one , essentially it came to a head and V VH one almost took her side. So I quit. Mm . So I started doing , but it , it worked out because I started , it was a really tough moment, but I started doing red carpet reporting. One thing led to the next, I started working for us weekly. Then people at, you know, vulture would be like, oh, I like what she does. Okay. And it just snowballed. But again, I was bored of the status quo question. So I thought, how do I take my really unique access and fill like a hole in the market that we aren't seeing. So I went out on red carpets with a selfie stick and that ultimately became my site , talk to me. So I would get the most high profile people in the world, you know , Morgan Freeman, Danny DeVito , Chris Pratt, to really open up to me. It was really disarming. And they would just like reveal EV like we're having wine night with the girls. Like they would just reveal all these things about their lives in that really controlled red carpet, you know, E news environment. So yeah, it's been quite a journey. And now I have my show, which is a branch, you know, a bit of a branch off of that. So, so yeah . Was talk to

Speaker 1:

Me, was that backed by someone or was that your own?

Speaker 2:

It was my solo dolo, like going out there and even that was so entrepreneurial and tough in and of itself. Right. Cause you're on a red carpet and you have the access Hollywoods and the E news and the extras and suddenly a girl going rogue with a selfie stick, you know, asking people about, you know, penis size and toxic masculinity and monogamy. And so I almost had to like convince them every time and their entourages, whatever to do it. So it hasn't been easy, but yeah, it's

Speaker 1:

Been interesting. Yeah. That's really brave. And did they allow you on the red carpet because you had already like been there with VH one , is that why you, you know, you were able to, or how did you do that?

Speaker 2:

Kind of? So I was a little sneaky say I was on an , on assignment for us weekly. Right. I would, I would hustle. So I would get everything else weekly needed. And then I was like, I'm already here. So I'd whip out my selfie stick and then get what I wanted for my own site. And then once I started to get really in the mix, I started covering things on my own for my site cuz I knew the publicists and things like that, but it was a , it was a mix.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Well that makes sense. That makes total sense. And then yeah, I just, as a side note, I watched your video about the Morgan Freeman. I read that article and then watched his video and it's like, you could see how innocent, just like fun. Like you compared it to a grandparent, you know, teasing you about your ripped jeans and stuff. So I really liked that you took the time to speak your, you know, truth and share that he wasn't like being creepy, you know?

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I've had so many instances like that, you know, that were so innocent. You know, Michael Douglas grabbing my nose, Danny DeVito , who's like three feet tall. You know, he and I are joking on the red carpet with my selfie stick about how his eyes are at my boob level, all these things and Morgan Freeman, same thing I'm wearing these ripped up Abercrombie jeans. He sits next to me and is looking at them like what's going on there? Like what are they supposed to be like, no , were they made like this or what? And it ended up getting misconstrued as this, this outlet tried to basically say he meed me. So I wrote a piece and Playboy saying no, who are you guys to say? I was totally fine with it. You know, this whole thing's gotten outta hand. So yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yes . That's I love that. Cause it's not just like one more person trying to like say, oh me too, you know? And just try to get famous for that. You know? So yeah.

Speaker 2:

Right. And it's like a to what, where do we start separating, you know, good old fashioned fun and things being inappropriate. And to me that was totally, totally fine. And it was not inappropriate and they tried to make it out like, yeah , it was. And it's like, you know, we have to draw a line . Like we have to be, you know, hu it's human nature acted to some degree, you know, we're not robots. So

Speaker 1:

Yeah, exactly. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and I would love to know like, what was the most, and if you don't have just one, like, you know, a couple or three, whatever, what was the most interesting and like deep answer that you got on the red carpet, like who said it and you know, what was it, if you can recall one,

Speaker 2:

Definitely there have been a lot, but I have to say one that really sticks out to me, especially in this world because we see everybody being so fake on social media and seem like, it seems like everything is just effortless. Like you look flosy, your life is awesome. Like you're on a yacht, you're this you're that you're doing cool things. Right, right . And no one, I feel like talks about the struggle or the come up , you know, and if they do it just feels fake. Like, you know, exa whatever, it's all these things like buzzwords that are thrown around and don't have depth. So one day on the carpet, I was just in my feelings. Like I was just feeling like, you know, I've been on this entrepreneurial grind and you know, when will something break through, you know, it's been a tough road. And I brought that to the carpet and I talked to, to for grace, who is this , you know, huge superstar was in that seventies show. Right. And I ask him kind of, I beat around the Bush and I'm like, talk to me about a time when you just were like, not that I was at rock bottom, but I was feeling like I was, I was like, talk about a time when you were at rock bottom, you know, everyone's lives on social media seemed so perfect. And that was that kind of disarming thing. Cuz he like puts his arm on my shoulder and he's like, what's going on Taylor? Like, let's talk it out. <laugh> so he ends up telling me about that 70 show. He's like, I never actually have shared this basically with anybody, but he's like, it was kind of a failure at the start and no one cared about it. It was this little show we felt like we were just like doing this for what? Literally no, like people could care less and no one gave a about it. And then suddenly, you know, I don't know, five seasons in or something. It just exploded. And now obviously that 70 show, I mean, I think they're doing a reboot, like it's a cult classic. Yeah . So his whole takeaway was just keep going because you never know when that moment will hit and when it will reach that kind of, you know, the mass , you know, that, that moment. So I thought that was just such a cool moment about life mm-hmm <affirmative> and could apply to anybody even outside of entertainment. And again, just really brought it down to earth and what's an often like superficial contrived, you know, Hollywood scene, red carpet moments . So that's something that really has stuck with me. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. That's awesome. I love, I actually love, I've watched every episode of the seventies show , so that's awesome to hear that

Speaker 2:

No way. So what do you , you would've been , you would have not even known that, right? Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I love, I still will watch, like if I'm in a bad mood and I wanna laugh, like I'll put it on just because it's so silly. Um that's

Speaker 2:

So that's like me with friends, I have to every night to just vacate my brain, but yeah, but it's like right. You would never know, so. Right.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And that's as a side note, I , I heard that like he had never done acting or something before that show. I don't know if that's true or not, but that's just something I had heard.

Speaker 2:

I don't remember. Well, actually I'm not sure about Topfer but similarly I had a conversation like this to your point with Dak shepherd , also huge star married to Kristen bell. Yeah . He told me a similar thing. He's like, I worked here for a decade, basically sleeping in a car, like all this same thing and then suddenly it hits a critical mass and you know, and I just think it's such, I just love hearing, hearing stories like that because you know, we're going through tough times. Yeah . And just to hear stories of perseverance again, when everyone tries to pass everything off, it's so glossy and perfect, I think, you know, is really important. So ,

Speaker 1:

Um , that's so important to hear it'll make other people like us, you know, or entrepreneurs just feel a little bit more like relief. Um,

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Like you're not in quick sand all the time , you know what I mean? It's like there's light at the end of the tunnel and taking it from people who are really successful, you know,

Speaker 1:

Is huge. Yeah . Um, yeah. So , um, then I've heard, so I heard, I can't remember if it was on your podcast or if it was on the , um , super connector interview, but I heard you say that when you've been pitching your ideas to more like PC , um , shows that they are like passing and you feel like maybe it's because they're , um, scared. Like I would love for you to speak to that. And then is this why you started your podcast or was, was it kind of like parallel?

Speaker 2:

Definitely. I mean, this goes back to my print days, like why I started my selfie stick stuff, because I always felt like put in a box, you know, approved questions beforehand or from editors, ask this, ask that. So between my site and my show cancel me, baby. It's just my sort of way of breaking out of everything and just being like, screw it. I'm gonna do things how I wanna do it. I don't need validation or approval from an editor this or that. So because even I , I learned my lesson early because even when I was in print, I worked at, you know, bustle again, vulture all these sites. I always came up against, you know, not problems, but them finding out of the box or provocative ideas I had, they wouldn't approve them cuz it wouldn't fit in their narrative. You know, I even had, I experienced this recently. I wrote an op-ed about Dave Portnoy , the founder of Barsol sports, similar thing to the Morgan Freeman, although allegations against him were more, were more serious. But business insider basically did this whole, me too . Series of hit pieces on Dave Porto . Now as somebody like me, I was on the red carpet. I literally was on the red carpet where me too times up started with the black dresses. I was there. I saw it unfold. I interviewed our Kelly survivors. So my whole point in this op-ed was what business insider was doing. Like villainizing me to similar to the Morgan Freeman thing with Dave Portnoy, wasn't helping women. Mm-hmm <affirmative> this is a perfect, this was just last year. And this is a perfect example because I sent it to all these outlets. No one picked it up, but I I'll never forget. I got an email from the Atlantic and they said to me, Taylor, this is such an important, you know, pressing thoughtful piece of journalism, but you know, we can't take it at this. You know, we can't take it at this time. Oh . And that's a perfect example because it's like, it doesn't fit in their box or in their narrative. Right. Because their narrative is believe all women, men are trash, men are bad and you know, that whole thing. So it ended up working out in my favor cuz it got the attention of Dave Portnoy and ended up coming on my show, which was a huge accomplishment. Cause he never goes on shows, but I find that all the time, even, you know, so tho that's that's that's, you know, a big example, but little examples like that all the time, if I'm pitching myself to speak to an issue or have a segment or go on other shows, I find that, you know, I think that they don't wanna rock the bow . I think that they wanna play it safe . So that's why, again, it's like, it's like grabbing the V one microphone out of the closet. It's like, you know what, someone's gotta do it. So <laugh> ,

Speaker 1:

I love that. It's very brave, but we need more people like that. Yeah. Um, and I remember after I saw you in our super connector mastermind, one of the first , um, episodes that I listened to was about an executive at Levi's, who stood up for herself, like turned down money. Um, essentially I can't remember the exact details and then walked, walked away feeling like she was not supported at all. Um, and then I also know you dealt with a similar situation, like you talked about with Chrissy Tegan and I've dealt with this in my own life as well. But like what do you think the solution is? And like, why are people so scared to rally around someone they're supposed to be supporting?

Speaker 2:

So a hundred percent and the , the story quickly that you're talking about is this executive at Levi's this woman who I think was with the company for years, stood up against school closures during COVID right . And we see this happen time and time again was ostracized by her coworkers was condemned, ultimately was offered a million dollars from Levi's to basically quietly like shut up and go away. And she publicly came out being like, I'm not taking the money, it's not worth it. And thank you yet again for corporation, you know, to this for squashing, any kind of, you know, outlying opinion or discourse and yeah, exactly. That's exa kind of what I experienced with my Christy Tegan thing. I wrote a , the piece I wrote for each one, I , I called her a hypocrite. I said, you know, you're over here crying victim that you're being bullied and retaliating random people on the internet, calling them names, being a bully. And when I wrote the piece, I totally became the scapegoat, my friends and employees and I , she and I had a tweet exchange and it was totally on my end, civil, I just said like, it's my opinion. You know, mm-hmm <affirmative> and everyone was like, they had me take the piece down. They were panicking. HR called me, even my friends were like, just delete your tweets. And I did, I was so panicked at the time cause I was like, it's gonna ruin my life. It's gonna , I'm just starting. It's gonna ruin my career. So I experienced it on such a hu high profile level and similar to this Levi's woman. And it's really sad. It's really sad because people are cowards. They don't wanna have your back. We see it happen all the time. Now at companies from Disney to routers. I mean, it's all over the place and it's really sad. And I think, you know, we're in a selfish kind of society. I think it's, self-interest people, people are like, I'm not gonna speak up. I don't , you , you go ahead, Taylor, go risk, good luck with that. But I'm not gonna risk my job. And especially now when it's like, the thought control is so deep. And if you even associate with, again being an outlier, you don't have to say anything these days. Like if you like something, if you like , you know, it's so extreme and it's sad.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it is.

Speaker 2:

And the solution,

Speaker 1:

Oh, sorry, go ahead.

Speaker 2:

No, I was gonna say the solution, you know, I think is it's what it should have been, you know, I don't know, six years ago when I wrote that crazy Teagan piece, it's like for people to just not be scared, it's like for what, what are you afraid of Chrissy Tegan for like, yeah . What are you afraid of your boss at BH ? You know what I mean? It's like, just stand up for what you think is right. I mean, you know, Yolo, <laugh> , that's , that's how I see it. It's a simplified way,

Speaker 1:

You know? Right. And yeah, I mean, I encourage my kids to speak their truth and you know, and, and sometimes I support what they've said to their teachers, you know, where other parents might not support that, but I want them to speak their truth and not be looked at as like less than, and really scared about the society because it's just like all the silencing, like we should all be able to share an opinion. And then mm-hmm , <affirmative> that kind of reminded me of the episode you had the other day , um, with , uh , Justin I'm forgetting his last name,

Speaker 2:

Right ? RA Bonnie . Yes .

Speaker 1:

Yes . Bonnie about his new site , Zion , um , <affirmative> loved that idea. I actually signed up for like version two or something, but that is such a great idea to

Speaker 2:

Have

Speaker 1:

That .

Speaker 2:

It really is his whole idea. And this is all a new space to me, but he's partnered with people like JP Sears. Who's well known YouTube, you know, comedian, Tony Robbins is an investor and it's in this kind of Bitcoin decentralized space. But the whole idea is no one owns you as a content creator. You don't have to depend on Spotify, on iHeart, on Patreon, on Instagram. You like own yourself. You're your own platform. So you decide it's not these arbitrary rules by, you know, Jack Dorsey and Twitter, whatever it's you decide , uh, it's your sandbox and you decide the rules of how people communicate. Um, what's allowed, what's not the content you put out and it's awesome. Yeah. It's really exciting.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it is. I , I love that. I was like, oh my gosh, this is awesome. <laugh>

Speaker 2:

I know, I know a lot of promise there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. Um, so my next question, and it's funny, I've, I've heard you say this too, where it's like, when you wanna talk about something that's so , um, divided it, like it made my stomach hurt, even writing this and even wanting to talk about this when it's really like, it should be okay to talk about this kind of stuff. And so I feel like our world is really divided and it's getting worse. Um, I have two daughters and a son I'm really worried about them. I wish I could just like, keep them home with me all day.

Speaker 2:

Um , I give you so much respect and all the moms who listen to my show, I say to them all the time, I want kids so bad. And I say, I don't know how you guys do it in this world. Like I give you, I have so much, you know, sympathy cause it's madness.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it is. Um, and you know, I am a very, I'm very proud to be a woman and a mother. And it's like, sometimes what I've seen since, you know, I was in the Silicon valley finance world forever. And I just recently , uh , for probably the last year have turned to this like digital space. And it's almost like, I feel less than because I'm not like BI or lesbian and don't get me wrong. I would totally support my kids like with their choices. But I feel like it's almost like being a basic woman or even man , um, it's almost portrayed as like, not, it's like being less than , um, and then I've also had people refuse to like collaborate with me because my sales copy says, you know, that I help women heal and transform rather than like more inclusive. But I am a woman and mother who I've healed from trauma and abuse from men. So this is what I feel comfortable teaching. And it's not because I don't wanna work with men. Um, like I've worked with all men in the Silicon valley finance space, but it wouldn't be appropriate in my mind. And I wouldn't, you know, I don't understand the biology of men. Right. And in my recent interview with Dr. John Gray, he stated like men and women are very different biologically and hormonally. Like that's just science and I'm not going to pretend like I know what men might be feeling or thinking when trying to heal from abuse specifically. So that , that's why I focus on women. That's what I know. Um, and it's just kind of offensive to me that , that someone would say, I'm sorry, I can't work with you because you're advertising. Copy says women, you know, mm-hmm , <affirmative> like , I would never say that to someone or discriminate someone like that. And I'm just like, I'm wondering what your thoughts are on this type of change. And do you notice this as well?

Speaker 2:

A hundred percent? Where do I even start? The thing is why do you have to justify wanting to help women? Like why you're like, you know, because it , it says women and excludes, like why do you have to even justify it? And you're 100%, right? Is that it's almost, we're in this topsy turvy culture where if you are what they call CI man or woman, you are literally less than I was reading a story the other day about this girl. I think she's like 20 or 21. She transitioned into a boy starting at , I don't know , 14, 15. She literally had a double mastectomy at 15 and now she's de transitioning. And she talks about how she was reading all these things on Tumblr on the internet. Right? How being a , a straight CIS woman. You're an oppressor. You , then you are just let it , just let that sink in. Okay . I'm sorry. What, what women couldn't women couldn't even vote until what? Like, are you kidding me? Why do we have the women's March? Why ? Like it's so insane. And I think it just shows how convoluted this entire thing has become. I'm really passionate about this as a woman. And I'll just say, you know, Justin and I talked about this in my episode. Mm-hmm <affirmative> he hit the nail in the head as well. It's like, we are so spoiled. Yeah . That we've run out of things to complain about. Yeah . And even before hopping on with you, I mean, I was reading about what's going on with women in Afghanistan and around the world. I mean, literally I was reading a story about a woman who was stoned into death in the streets for cheating on her husband. Like, it just, it boils my blood because it's like, but here we are in the states now gonna somehow villainize woman , like, are you kidding me? So it just, it makes me wanna scream because it's like put things in perspective. People like really give me a break. Right . I will totally respect you. And the lane you're in trans or whatever it is, but my issue with it. And this is like, what we've seen with the JK rally is why do you have to villainize and demonize somebody who advocates for, for women? Like, yeah . Are we just gonna have ion forget the last, I dunno , how many centuries were women were treated less than for women ? Like give me a break. So, you know, none of it makes sense.

Speaker 1:

No it doesn't. And yeah, I remember that Justin said something about, he has a , he has friends in Libya who like, don't even have power for part of the day. And it's like, we're sitting here focusing on, get my pronoun. Right. And it's like, yeah . Do you think these people are, that woman is , is like worried about pronouns. It's like no

Speaker 2:

Hundred .

Speaker 1:

It's insane. So think

Speaker 2:

About Afghanistan with thet band taking over these women were given the promise of getting an education and being in the workforce. And now that's all taken away from them. They're shot dead in the street. Can't show their faces, but we're gonna exactly to your point, we're gonna be complaining about this stuff. So I just think it's a joke and I think people need to, you know, <laugh> have a little focus here, you know? Yeah ,

Speaker 1:

Yeah . Some perspective it's yeah . It's drive crazy. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

A hundred percent

Speaker 1:

<laugh> um, and so another thing that I think I've heard you mention this before , um, so years ago and one of my relationships, I was with a man who was like really set on being the alpha man. And he would talk about it all the time that he was alpha. However, he couldn't hold a job or pay for anything. So I was literally the one like paying for everything. And I was the like traditional man. That's how it felt. And then he would tell me, like, you think you're alpha. That's why we don't get along, like fighting with me. And I said, you know, why do you think you're alpha? And why can't we just be equal? You know, mm-hmm <affirmative> um , and I just didn't get it, but he took it as me being, you know, disrespectful. He really was this traditional like, man, but wasn't doing the traditional stuff. And I'm not about that. I'm I'm into like equal partnerships. Um, and side note , I , I think maybe he has a hatred towards women because his mother let him, you know, get beat by his father, whatever. Um, but it was really hard. And especially when like the facts were the facts and to me, this is like a type of toxic , toxic masculinity, but I actually, haven't done a lot of research. And so I am not the expert. I would love for you to share, like, what do you think represents it ? Like the toxic, feminine and the toxic masculinity.

Speaker 2:

So hearing you talk , and I'm so sorry that you had that experience and hearing you talk about it. I almost feel like, and I explore these themes a lot on my show. And even back when I was on the red carpet with celebrities, we would talk about this kind of thing. I feel like there is value in traditional gender roles, right. Women being nurturers, and let's not lie holding the together. Like men cannot survive without us. Sorry. They can't. And they know it. And men, you know, taking care of you and stepping up and, and being strong, you know, all those kind of things. Right. So I think there's value in that. But funny enough, I feel like toxic masculinity and femininity are almost those ideals to the extreme and weaponized. So femininity is like, I feel like we see women weaponizing being a woman, you know, mm-hmm , <affirmative> , I feel like now Amber heard , I do think she was , um, I , I don't like how the internet is like totally going hand mocking her with this whole trial. But I do think to some degree, I think it was a mutually abusive, toxic relationship. Right. But I also think it's, it's kind of evident she was the abuser and I feel like she weaponized me too and womanhood by acting solely as a victim. Right. So I think that that can be toxic, you know, Jada pink . It , I think that's another example. It's like what we saw with will Smith that was totally inappropriate. And the , just like all the things that she's done and not taking accountability for and letting that go and not, you know, I just, that's another example. And on the male side, same thing. I mean, I , I always make fun of the idea of toxic masculinity on my show. Cause I just don't like the idea of, you know, putting a label on everything and like again, blaming, you know, men and the patriarchy for the way our society is. I just think it's outdated and kind of silly. But my idea of that is, again, men playing up almost that ma like too, like to the point where it's too much , like we're superior and I'm gonna belittle you and patronize you and talk down to you and oh , you little woman . Oh, you know, that kind of thing. So I think it's, I think, but, but funny enough notice how like women being toxic, even if it's like pettiness in the workplace, right. Or how catty they are. We never hear about that. That's the other reason why I always kind of poke fun at toxic masculinity. Cause I'm like, oh, I see women are angels and men are all bad. I got it. You know? <laugh>

Speaker 1:

Yeah .

Speaker 2:

It's like they're hand in hand .

Speaker 1:

Yeah. No. And I actually, that just reminded me of this quote. I saw the other day , um, on someone's page and it said something about like when the, when a man is weak, not, not meaning like, you know, in a negative way, but just like maybe not holding it together at the , in the house. Um, it makes the woman like step into like step into her, like toxic masculinity. And then she becomes like unbalanced and it really affects the relationship. And it, I can't , I'm not saying it the right way, but it really represented, you know, what happened with me. So I don't know if that kind of makes sense,

Speaker 2:

But it does. And I also feel like in your situation, and this speaks to the bigger picture too, and you said it perfect is weakness. And I think there's an element of it. That's self-assurance and confidence. So even like call it toxic masculinity. Sure . But I feel like things like being a misogynist or a sexist, or, you know, having to put down a woman or dig on a woman to make yourself feel better. It's like, dude, really like, I love how this guy, I follow. He has a great podcast. He put it as small Dick energy and I feel like that puts it perfect. It's like, you're totally a loser. Right. It's like, you're just a loser. And you just don't like, you literally lack that much confidence that you need to like put a woman down to feel better about yourself. And it goes the other way too, with women doing it to men, you know? Yeah . Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Totally. Yeah. That's funny. It's very true.

Speaker 2:

It's true though.

Speaker 1:

<laugh> it's true. Um , yeah . Yeah. And so , um, to wrap back to that episode that you just had with , um, Justin , um, I know, so my questions are all over the place. Sorry. But no ,

Speaker 2:

I

Speaker 1:

Love that . Um, I loved the, the way that he explained web three . So I've been on a lot of like, I'm part of , um , my BFF. I don't know if you , if you've heard of that, but it's like all these women , um, like Mila Kus , Gweneth, Paltro all these women coming together to help other women learn more about crypto and NFTs. Oh,

Speaker 2:

Cool.

Speaker 1:

Yeah . And

Speaker 2:

Into that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. It's really cool. It's called my BFF and it's , uh , the co-founder is Brit Mor who she's amazing. I was just in a course with her and I was, I won like second place in a pitching contest and she's just amazing.

Speaker 2:

Oh , nice.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And so she started this because she really has like a mission to help women succeed and she really wants women to get into the crypto and Ft space. So they have all of these videos and, you know, I've been watching them and , and web three, just like, ah , I just couldn't really grasp the concept. But then the way that Justin explained it, I don't know if it was just after learning all of this, but it was just like, oh, like a light went on. I finally understood. And then the way he said, like there's only whatever it was, 21 million Bitcoin or something. And , and once it's gone, like it's gone , um, on , um, and I'm taking a course right now called the sovereign sovereign way, which I think maybe is in parallel to what he was saying about like the laws and stuff, the foundational laws. Um, but I was just curious, did that make you want to like, learn more about crypto and invest in, you know, whatever Bitcoin and then what do you think about web three ?

Speaker 2:

Definitely. I mean, I am a bit of a tra I'm very excited about this new world, especially because when I do and my content and ownership and control and being an entrepreneur, but I am a bit of a traditionalist, so there's a part, like, I feel like I have my feet, you know, remember that scene in a walk to remember where he's like, you're in two states at once. Like his , the , you know, and I feel like that it's like she has her one foot on this state on the state line and then another, and I feel like that's as well. So I'm a little skeptic. I don't own any Bitcoin, but the part that I have, like I said, in that episode, I have a hard time kind of wrapping my head around the financial aspect of it and the , the money side. But the part that speaks to me is the, like I said, the ownership. So my big takeaway is that you essentially in this world have your own existing ID, it's yours. So you can exist on Gmail, on Instagram, on Spotify. And if, if , if they get rid of the, if they get rid of it like this, they get rid of Instagram, you don't exist. You're still here on this idea . Like you have this ever present , um, you know, presence, I guess that just doesn't go away that you own, and it's not dependent on another platform or host for you to exist or to be seen. And that is the part to me. That's really exciting. Um, it's just the money side of it. I have to get up on that, but I do see it as being like, you know, being the future. I definitely see a lot of potential and prosperity there. So I'm excited about that for sure.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And I went and looked at well. So when I bought that course, the sovereign way , um, they made me, well, no, they didn't make me, but they said, if you purchase it with Bitcoin, then it was like 50% off. And so it took me an hour to figure out how to buy the Bitcoin, how to get in the wallet. And then I still ended up messing it up and I sent it in a different format and they couldn't tra it was like, I really need to learn like the basics. Yes. Um ,

Speaker 2:

And I feel through a lot, the reason I say I'm skeptical is because I feel like I'm already seeing a lot of scams. And even when I post something on Instagram about Bitcoin, like my episode with Justin, I'll get blasted with all of these spam Bitcoin, this, that, so that's the part about it that I am kind of reluctant, but it's just to your point, like getting well versed in it and understanding it and knowing how to navigate.

Speaker 1:

Right. Yeah. I actually have a guest later this month, her name's Ashley Armstrong. She's in the mastermind too. I don't know if you know her, but she , um , released this course called the plan and it's all about crypto and it's it like sold 50 million or something like, it was the biggest like course month . Wow . Yeah. So she's gonna come on and like, I can't wait to ask her a bunch of questions about all of this . Oh ,

Speaker 2:

Cool . Yeah . That that's the start. And even interviewing Justin, like there are times I'm literally staring and drooling . Crossey being like, what did , what, like, what did you just say? But we have to start somewhere, you know? Exactly. So, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah . No, and it's interesting because I actually went on to Bitcoin and it's like, you can't buy like one Bitcoin, you can only buy a fraction. It's so expensive. So , um, really, but it's really it's down right now. So like, I feel like now would be the good time I might buy just like a little bit. Um , mm-hmm <affirmative> but it's just scary. It's like such an unknown.

Speaker 2:

So exactly. Yeah , exactly.

Speaker 1:

Um, so if my listeners wanted to learn more about you, like, what are the top three , um, episodes that they should listen to first? Like, what would you recommend? I know you have like a lot, but what would be like the top three?

Speaker 2:

Awesome. Um, as far as guests episodes with guests, I have high profile people on often two of my favorites are my episode with Dave Portnoy , because again, that was so rare. He just doesn't do that kind of thing. So that was really, it was such a great conversation too, because we really went where people don't with the me too conversation and his vantage point as a guy getting accused and where he stands. That was all really interesting. I also had a really fun interview with the girls gone wild founder, Joe Francis . Oh, nice. And he does not give a <laugh> and it's so refreshing because people say this all the time, like he say , he says things that are kind of cringe, but he's so endearing. And it , it's almost like, he's so honest that it's hard to, it's hard to like fault him or be mad or, you know what I mean, put off by him because he is just so honest that you're kind of like, I can't really fault him, you know? Right. So we get into all kinds of like wokeness and Hollywood and misogyny and me too. And he talks about like his, literally his interactions with Harvey Weinstein. It's really fascinating. Wow. Um , and then in terms of oddly enough , I feel like my audience kind of likes my solo episodes more than guests because they kind of like, they know what they're getting and they're like, where is she gonna go with this? But I , I would say, you know, I did one actually this one's current. I really like the one that I have on the Roe V Wade debate. Mm-hmm <affirmative> um , because I talk about how, and that's the thing too, like I'm not politically in a box, so I talk about how the left and the right, and this whole idea of like autonomy and having sang control of your body where they're both hypocritical and get it wrong. Yeah . So I would say that is, has a good, you know, is a good flavor.

Speaker 1:

Uh , okay, awesome. Mm-hmm <affirmative> yeah. I'll have to listen to that one because <laugh> , I didn't quite understand it. And I posted something and then one of my friends, she was like, what, why would you post that? Like, what are you thinking? And I just didn't understand it. So I took it down and then I asked my step . Who's like, he knows everything in the news and the politics. And can you tell me more about that ? So , um, you know, I like to learn more before I actually post, but I also feel very strongly about , uh , autonomy for our bodies and being able to choose no matter what it is, we should have the right to choose, you know, for our bodies. But , um, that's how I feel. Yeah. So I'll have to listen to that one.

Speaker 2:

Yep . That one , um, there's another one it's kind of in the , in the same vein and it talks about it was from earlier this year and it talks about how women on both, again, kind of both sides of the aisle. Like I compare AOC and Candace Owens, both, you know, huge figures and pop culture. Couldn't be more opposite, but I talk about how, oddly enough, they're two sides of the same coin and yes. With whether it be like narc and it , and how it speaks to society, you know, being self-absorbed and narcissism and you know, all of that. So that was fun to play around with too.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, that sounds great. Oh , I'll have to go listen to that one. <laugh> I know I've been like , I've been driving so much, so I was like, you know, preparing for interview interview. So I was listening to like, just so many and they're, they're amazing. There's a lot. So you've been doing this for like you

Speaker 2:

So much.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. It's awesome. Two

Speaker 2:

Year , a little over two year . Yeah. Almost two and a half now. Yep . It's been such an evolution and it's also an evolution, I think in really kind of like the Joe Francis , I find myself like what you said, should I not have posted that? Mm-hmm , <affirmative> , I'm really trying to hone in on really just not giving a. I mean, I already don't, but really cuz I find myself on some subconscious level being like, you know, you wanna be respectful to this group and that group and just really unleashing it and being like, you know what? Yeah . It's like you defending your practice. Right. And being like, well here's why it's for women. It's like, no, like to stop apologizing, stop qualifying, stop defending ourselves. You know, it's been an evolution in , in that way too of just like really going for it and not apologizing. So

Speaker 1:

Yeah. That's great. And I hope more people journey. Yeah. I , I really hope it inspires more people to do the same. Um, so that we can, I hope start. Yeah. Seeing more positivity. I just feel like it's so negative in this world right now. It's just scary. So

Speaker 2:

You know what it is. I don't know if you have heard of him, but David Meltzer , he is a, he's almost like a little Tony Robbins. He used to be this like big time sports exec. He's like a huge entrepreneur and like a self-help guru kind of thing. And we've become friends. He's been on my show and I love the way that he put it. And it kind of speaks to what you just said. He talks about how people now just are so judgemental mm-hmm <affirmative> and have so many like conditional, like I'll talk to you if you do this. And he said like, what I love about you in your show is just, it , it drops all that. Like it drops the judgment, it drops, the preconceived notion, the conditions. And I thought that was such a, you know, kinda elevated way of, you know, capturing it. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah . That's beautiful. Um, and then, sorry, I have one more question. I just thought no. Um, have you ever had a guess that you've asked a question and , and they've said like, I don't wanna answer that or like have been kind of put off, I'm just curious.

Speaker 2:

<laugh> I'm trying to think on my show

Speaker 1:

<affirmative> or yeah, just in general.

Speaker 2:

Yeah . Yeah. So on my show, not so much. And I've had controversial, you know, things in people. I mean, I had far Abraham on who is so controversial with MTV. She as someone who doesn't give a and that's someone who too, I had to navigate talking to her about getting canceled from MTV and controversial things she said, you know, so I try to make it kind of an open space. Um, but I will say, I mean, there have been a , a lot of times on the red carpet in that kind of setting, I'll give you two really quickly. One was, this was really disappointing. Um, I was on assignment for vulture and they were having me, it was on the heels of me too. And they were a having me ask people if me too had really changed behind the scenes sets dynamics. So I asked Jennifer Garner and couldn't be bothered like her rep, you know, tugged her away. And that kind of stuff really bugged me because it's like, listen, like we're all grown people, we're grown women. And I just, I hate that kind of thing. It's like, yeah , at least if you don't wanna speak to it being like, listen, I totally respect it . I get it. But not at this time. But it was one of those, like where it's like, it was like, they were like test test to me. You know, I don't appreciate that a similar story. And I'm actually gonna talk about this with my guest , um, that I'm shooting with today is I interviewed Scott Eastwood, Clint Eastwood's son and Scott. I was interviewing him for the Hollywood reporter and he was promoting of all things, this company, I think he founded it or partnered with it. And it was this like American made brand , like, you know, basic cotton shirts and whatever all made in America. Now, Clint, his dad is very vocal about politics. I think he's very publicly like right leaning . And given that Scott has the most famous dad on the planet is promoting an America first brand. You know, I wasn't getting into the weeds of politics, but I think I had kind of like alluded to something like American pride or, and he was so rude. Like he kind of was a Dick about it. Honestly. He was like, I'm not even going there. I'm not going there. Like I'm not even going anything like remotely close to that. Meanwhile, we're in a conference room like this long table filled with, I don't know, 10 people from his entourage and just me there to hold my own and Def , you know, navigate. So Ugh . Stuff like that happen all the time. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Ugh . That's

Speaker 2:

It's like, you're a public figure, like come on. Yeah . Right. You know,

Speaker 1:

Like be kind and there's better

Speaker 2:

Ways. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. It's not hard. And I get it, you know, I talked to Kristen bell about this. I know we talked about Dak shepherd cuz she and Dak shepherd are so down to earth. And I talk to her about that. I'm like, I've interviewed everybody. How are you guys? So down to earth when so many people in this business are such mm-hmm <affirmative> and she said, you know, maybe, you know , we're hu you know , they're human. Maybe they're having an off day and, and I get it, but it's also like, you know what, I'm trying to do my job too. And also being a human is just having decency and respect. I just don't find the need for that kind of behavior. You know?

Speaker 1:

Never, never,

Speaker 2:

Yeah. That's inappropriate. Yeah. Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You must have really tough skin by now. <laugh>

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Oh my God. Yes. You, I, one time on a carpet really quickly, I got chewed out by Jane Lynch. It's like when I first I was like maybe a couple months in a red carpet reporting out in Hollywood and she like kind of similar to the Scott Eastwood thing. It was around the election and it was something so basic. I was like, what do you love about America? I was on, I was there for bustle . And she was like, that's what you're gonna ask me on the , in front of, am I editor in front of all these people? I called my mentor crying. I was like, I'm never gonna work on red carpet and little did I know, but yeah. It's just not necessary.

Speaker 1:

No. Well, and I'm sure that's helpful for people to hear, you know, just keep going and it'll get better. Yeah . Or you'll be yeah. Tough skin. <laugh>

Speaker 2:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

To say the loose . Well , thank you so much for your time. It's been so nice having you on here. And can you just share where , um, where people can find you like where you're the most active and yeah . I'll also link notes . So

Speaker 2:

Definitely. Well , and I wanna thank you too . And I wanna thank you for being so thoughtful and soulful and engaged and such a supporter of my work in the show and forgetting it. I appreciate. And I appreciate you being so honest about where you're at with things. So I appreciate you so much. Um, yes. I'm the most active sadly on Instagram and yeah. I'm you talk to me, Taylor , that's my Instagram. That's my selfie. Stick on YouTube. All those fun interviews are there and my show is, cancel me, baby. And it's everywhere. It's on. I GTV YouTube, Spotify, iHeart, apple. Uh , but yeah, it's definitely unlike anything out there. So , uh, join along for the ride . I'm looking forward to having you, you all, hopefully.

Speaker 1:

Well, ladies that wraps it up. Thank you so much for being a part of my circle. Check out the show notes for all the links I mentioned and some surprise ones, please make sure to subscribe. And if you're feeling generous, leave a review, especially if I was able to help you out in some way that helps me get into the ears of more women like us who are ready to level up their lives. Join me for wellness Wednesday on Instagram at Angela Marie Christian . I'll share mindfulness techniques for you to do at home at the office or on the go until next time my friends stay safe .